To advocate equal opportunities for men and women through sport by encouraging women to have roles at all levels and in all structures, especially in the executive bodies of national sports-oriented organisations.

Promoting the role of Women within Sport The International Olympic Committee (IOC) gender policy is highly concerned by women’s involvement in decision-making structures of our member sports organizations. It is necessary that both women and men be able to contribute to sports organisations with their knowledge, expertise and ideas.

The NZOC, along with the Olympic Movement, is firmly convinced of the need to encourage sports practice among women, and is working to that end, at the same time taking cultural aspects into account and accommodating them. Women must also play a greater part in decision-making. It is our task to facilitate access by women to leadership positions within national and world sport, as it is through them that these ideas can be passed on to future generations, since women are still the privileged interlocutors for education in the broadest sense of the term.

Although there has been great progress in their participation in physical activities and in the Olympic Games, the percentage of women leaders and administrators in the IOC, International Sports Federations or National Olympic Committees is still very low. This is one area in which the Olympic Movement has to make a special effort. Therefore, the IOC adopted the following proposal in July 1996:

  • The NOCs should immediately establish a goal to be achieved by 31 December 2000 that at least 10% of all the offices in all their decision-making structures (in particular all legislative or executive agencies) be held by women and that such percentage reach at least 20% by 21 December 2005.
  • The International Federations, the National Federations and the sports organizations belonging to the Olympic Movement should also immediately establish as a goal to be achieved by 31 December 2000 that at least 10% of all positions in all their decision-making structures (in particular all legislative or executive agencies) be held by women and that such percentage reach at least 20% by 21 December 2005.
  • The subsequent stages to reach a strict enforcement of the principle of equality for men and women shall be determined from the year 2001.
  • The Olympic Charter will be amended to take into account the need to keep equality for men and women.

The IOC is aware of the fact that such a goal can only be reached progressively and that successive stages must be set to this effect. Many NOCs and Ifs have responded positively and are cooperating with the IOC in this regard. Therefore as part of the NZOC Strategic Plan, under the section “To provide innovative leadership through sport”, and in line with the IOC’s gender policy, Olympic Member Sport Federations were contacted and asked to take part in this important audit.

The results were extremely positive. Unfortunately only 29 out of the 41 federations have responded so far, but out of those 29 federations, only 3 were under the 2001 goal of 10%, and 23 out of the 29 have already met the 2005 target of 20% of women in decision-making positions.

One area of concern is Management, where 14 of the 28 federations have fewer than 20% of women in Governance. While this is not a major concern, it is an area where encouragement would be beneficial.